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Grateful Dead

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Grateful Dead

Collection

JUST LISTEN TO THE MUSIC PLAY

ELEMENTALS

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ELEMENTALS

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"It's hard to underestimate how incredible a bespoke pair of in-ears really sounds, let alone the comfort of a custom shell."

 

JOHN DOE

The Grateful Dead was more than a band—they were a way of life. Their psychedelic performances used sight, sound, and emotion to leave an indelible mark on rock and roll. Today, the Dead makes its mark on Ultimate Ears.

The Grateful Dead was more than a band—they were a way of life. Their psychedelic performances used sight, sound, and emotion to leave an indelible mark on rock and roll. Today, the Dead makes its mark on Ultimate Ears.

HAVE A LITTLE TASTE

Beyond just a band, the Grateful Dead was a way of life. Weave sight and sound with iconic earphone designs celebrating the Dead’s bohemian aesthetic and rebellious nature.

INSPIRATION,
MOVED US BRIGHTLY

LIGHTNING SKULL

LIGHTNING SKULL

Appearing everywhere from album covers to festival art, the Dead’s lightning skull may be its most iconic design. Their sound engineer, Owsley “Bear” Stanley, originally used this Bob Thomas design to quickly I.D. the band’s equipment at multi-act gigs. As the Dead Head army grew, the skull established itself as badge for the turned on, tuned in, and dropped out. Few symbols have defined an era more strongly.

Appearing everywhere from album covers to festival art, the Dead’s lightning skull may be its most iconic design. Their sound engineer, Owsley “The Bear” Stanley, originally used this Bob Thomas design to quickly I.D. the band’s equipment at multi-act gigs. As the Deadhead army grew, the skull established itself as badge for the turned on, tuned in, and dropped out. Few symbols have defined an era more strongly.

SKULL & ROSES

Stanley "Mouse" Miller's design first appeared on the cover of the Dead’s second live album. When their label refused to greenlight the NSFW title the band wanted, they agreed to release the record with no printed titles anywhere. To this day, Deadheads affectionately refer to this album as “Skull & Roses” for its eye-popping art.

The Dead’s most cuddly piece of iconography was first seen inside 1973’s History of the Grateful Dead. The colorful bears march in step to an unseen piper. One could be forgiven for seeing dancing bears instead, especially when under the influence of one of Owsley “Bear” Stanley’s concoctions (the man trusted with both the band’s sound production and chemical stimulation, who inspired this artwork).

THE DANCING BEARS

STEAL YOUR FACE

SKULL & ROSES

Stanley Mouse’s design first appeared on the cover of the Dead’s second live album. When their label refused to greenlight the NSFW title the band wanted, they agreed to release the record with no printed titles anywhere. To this day, Dead Heads affectionately refer to this album as “Skull & Roses” for its eye-popping art.

THE DANCING BEARS

The Dead’s most cuddly piece of iconography was first seen inside 1973’s History of the Grateful Dead Vol. 1 (Bear’s Choice). The colorful bears march in step to an unseen piper. One could be forgiven for seeing dancing bears instead, especially when feeling the groovy vibes of a Jerry Garcia guitar solo.